An Exercise on Perspective

when-you-change-the-way-you-look-at-things-the-things-you-look-at-change

An Exercise on Perspective

Last week I did an exercise with 60 of my most competitive athletes.  I gave them a list of people and things and ask them to write down the first word that came to mind.  It did not have to be nice.  It did not have to be pretty.  These lists were private.  Here is the list, starting with the easy ones.

Cats are...

Dogs are...

Boys are...

Girls are...

Men are...

Women are...

Teachers are...

My Coaches are...

Competitor X is...

Competitor Y is...

My team is...

My Mom is...

My Dad is...

I am...

I asked them to look at each word and ask themselves if that was the MOST BENEFICIAL thought or belief they could hold about that person or group of people.  Were they wasting energy wishing that someone would be different?  Were they focusing on their competitors instead of their team?  Were they failing to see someone's positive qualities because they were focused on the negative?

The skaters looked hard at their lists and changed the beliefs that they thought they needed to change.

I shared with them that I have done this exercise with the names of all my athletes, assistant coaches, co-director, and team manager.  It is a powerful way for me to evaluate whether or not I am doing my part to bring out the best in every individual in our organization.

As a coach, it is clear that it is my responsibility to try to help everyone around me rise to their true potential.  But, what would happen if each one of our athletes took on this role, as well?  What would happen if everyone in our organization tried to support each other in being the very best version of themselves?  What would happen if they each believed in their own true potential?

I would like our athletes to repeat this exercise with their team rosters.  Write down the name of each one of your teammates and yourself and write the FIRST WORD that comes to mind.  It doesn't need to be positive.  It doesn't need to be pretty.  Be honest.  Then, take a second look at each one and ask yourself if this is the MOST BENEFICIAL belief you can hold about your teammate.   Change any of the words that you think need to be changed.  Think hard to find positive and very true words to describe each athlete on your team.  Write at least three positive and very true things about yourself.

Let’s see what magic happens when we focus our energy on seeing the positive.

Big thanks to Joshua Michael Medcalf, of Train 2B Clutch, for this exercise.

Massive love,

Ashleigh

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *